By Nonoy L. Lauzon
(UP Film Institute)

ThePrenup1The world stays flawed, imperfect and far from ideal with rom-coms such as this!

Rom-coms are like antiseptics. They cleanse and disinfect but are actually no match to far deadlier viruses. They misrepresent the joys and pains of love and always end up painting a rosy picture of the human experience bereft of true insight into the realities of the world.

Have you ever wondered why Filipinos will never be good at picking national leaders? It’s because they are fed with more than allowable dosage of rom-coms.

The tragedy of Philippine nationhood lies in the propensity of its people to lap up every single variation of the rom-com mode for big-screen viewing. And for a long while, it had been the industry’s bread and butter; the sure-fire formula for the 100-million-buck earnings at the box office.
It is in this quagmire that Jun Lana’s The Prenup, starring Jennylyn Mercado and Sam Milby is caught. Spare ourselves the synopsis. Let’s just say that the film has a storyline far better told in far better films like La Cage aux Folles that is itself an adaptation of the sensational stage play of the same title.

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No, it’s not the lack of chemistry between the leads that is the problem with the film. Neither is its implausible plot. It tackles class antagonism, gender sensitivity, battle of the sexes and even environmental awareness. But why is it that – in the course of watching – audiences have felt being taken for a ride, shortchanged of their money’s worth and dissuaded to find anything meritorious in the film?
For all the advocacies the film purports to uphold, none of them manage to elicit the sympathy of the viewers. It is as if the filmmakers have decided to fill up their films with all sorts of social concerns only to manifest their own disdain for these pet causes.
Beyond the corny jokes, the slapstick and the coterie of annoying characters, The PreNup fails for the untruths it rams down audiences’ throats.

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